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trouble negotiating steps. he started using the cane several months ago. >> reporter: in his announcement, the pope said, quote,"i have had to recognize my incapacity to adequately fulfill the ministry entrusted to me." pope benedict xvi has overseen a series of scandals and controversy, including the sex abuse crisis in the catholic church. his critics charge he was not progressive enough, upset he condemned gay marriage, the ordination of women, and allowing priests to marry. but supporters viewed him as a steadfast leader, and praised him for warning against the subtle influence of secularism. >> wendy: joining us now with thoughts on these developments, is dr. cornelius becker a professor at regent university. thank you so much for being on the program. >> it greats to be with you. >> wendy: it is so unusual for a pope to step down, almost unprecedented, cepts fo -- exempt for that one time 600 years ago. >> it is unprecedented. weren't we've had several popes that have resigned for the position, but never for the reason this pope has offered, frail health and advanced age. i think it
for a chance to apply for asylum in greece. >> we slept in the stores because the police came to look for us every day. >> world leaders deny there is a global currency war. are all the major powers secretly devaluing? inventors often are not rewarded. >> people who are supposed to run our innovation units treat me like dirt. >> when it comes to refugees and migrants, agrees is the front door of europe. at one point, 300 people a day were crossing greece's border with turkey illegally. on mass roundup was 70,000 people picked up off the streets in six months. these are the figures, but behind them, he minute stories. we have one man's account of his journeys through the system. this was the biggest textile factory in greece. today, it lies abandoned and is famous for something else. felt here a year ago, hundreds of migrants were squatting in the factory, desperate to get out of a greece. >> it does not feel like europe. this is no europe. >> my guide was this man. a moroccan living in the factory. place,en, as we left the i never expected to see him again. today, at the factory looks quiet,
. following the consequences of the drought last year, the president directed us to create a drought task force, made up of all federal agencies, to try to mitigate the impacts and effects of drought. that led us to begin thinking at usda about steps we can take to help producers during a difficult time. we took a series of steps to try to mitigate the consequences. we opened up crp land, and changed premium payments, things of that nation -- that nature. it also got us thinking -- were there other steps, other things we should be doing, to provide help and assistance? it occurred to us perhaps we should be focused more acutely on the need to encourage multi- cropping through the united states, in order for us to do a better job of conservation, to create biomass that could be a revenue source, and to potentially allow us to conserve precious water resources, which would in turn allow us to get through these drought circumstances in a more favorable circumstance. we have begun a process of looking at ways in which we could provide assistance. you will be fortunate to hear from a fellow by
used was one of the best we had ever encountered. >> so mr. al-awlaki is by not an american citizen by where anyone in america would be proud? >> he was part of al qaeda, and it was his determination to kill americans on behalf of al qaeda. >> thank you. is it true that in the last four years the fbi has arrested 100 people, either planning, conspiring, or trying to commit a terrorist attack on this nation? >> yes, they have arrested a lot of people. >> that is because of good, sound intelligence. i think what people forget is that they will kill us if they can and it is extraordinarily difficult if you cannot get into where they were hiding. would it have been possible to have arrested mr. al-awlaki where he was in the yemen? >> we work very closely with yemenis to see if we can arrest individuals. if we can, we want to do that because it is valuable for us. any actions taken in concert with the yemeni government are done in terms of any types of strikes we might engage there with them, are done only because we do not have the ability to bring those individuals into custody. >> tha
that is the biggest window. that is not over populated by u.s. capacity and capability. it is not religious. it is a it is not religious. we can extend it as needed. it should make us be more urgent. we find that when we bring urgency to almost any discussion inside of the u.s. government is a constructive thing to do. >> there are a number of areas in the u.s. government that look at failed and failing state. the undersecretary for political affairs has that responsibility. dns see used to chair and -- the nsc used to chair a committee. how does cso play into this? >> we try to work with everyone that you mentioned. we want to be aggregators of talent and good work that has gone on. for example, something as simple as analytics, we have a metadata analyst in our shop now, but we want him to be an aggregator of aggregators. i keep saying you have to be made silver on steroids -- nate silver on steroids. we cannot run enough staff to review and it turns out the intelligence community loves being called by the state department. they are flattered by it. they want their wo
. testified about the attack thon u.s. consulate in benghazi, libarch that killed ambassador stevens and three other americans. the pentagon never received the request from the state academy for security, and did not have the resources to get support on the ground in time to thwart the attackers. leon panetta is stepping down. this hearing is four hours and 15 minutes. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good morning, everybody. today the committee welcomes secretary of defense, leon panetta, and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, general martin dempsey. to testify about the department of defense's response the deadly terrorist attack on the u.s. temporary mission facility in benghazi, libya, last year. and the findings of its internal review following that attack, including lessons learned from benghazi. we will be receiving testimony next tuesday morning on the impact of sequestration and/or a full-year continuing resolution on the department of defense witnesses. there will be department secretary of defense, the comp driller and the joint chiefs of staff. i hope
washington post" know. we had good relationships not only with chen and his allies. they would call us when there were developments, like the case of chen's nephew, who was jailed. we have good contacts. >> you are going to harvard? >> i am. >> what for? you have left china for good? >> i have. from one great institution to another. i will be leading a study trip -- a study group on china. i will be looking at different sections of the study group, the rise of the internet. chinese twitter, the impact that has. we will look about the leadership of china to see what that will mean about the possibilities of reform. one session will last at media coverage, specifically american media coverage, of china. and how that shapes perceptions. the foreign media and how we cover things shape how we view china. we write about him and rights, china's dramatic growth rates, china as a competitor, their education system producing more graduates. i want to look more specifically about that. i want to vote -- to devote another section to chinese political campaigns. being in china, watching the campaigns he
as a u.s. senator from massachusetts. mr. president, i am proud to join my colleagues today in support of the violence against women act of 2013. i do so not just as a senator but as a mother of two daughters. this critical legislation has been held up for far too long, and it's past time for reauthorization. we have a serious responsibility to ensure that women and families are protected. the rates of violence and abuse in our country are astounding and totally unacceptable. according to a 2010c.d.c. study, domestic violence affects more than 12 million people each year. across the united states, 15 1/2 million children lives in homes in which domestic violence has occurred. and in my home state of north carolina alone, 73 women and children are killed on average every year because of domestic violence. let me say that number one more time. 73 women and children are killed every year due to domestic violence. these are alarming statistics, and we must act now to address them. since 1994, vawa programs, and in particular the stop program, that provides grants for services, training, of
at 9:30 eastern, the us- india relations at the carnegie endowment for international peace. and they look at sequestration, and automatic spending cuts set to go into effect march 1 that will affect federal workers. that is a 2 --- that is at 2:30 p.m. eastern. >> from the start, we told the board that the approach we were going to take, pretty straightforward. remember, we were set -- sent there to fix gm. that was the mission. go make this thing a viable company again. so we were all focused, and brought the message we are going to design, build, and sell the world's best vehicles. we are going to move quickly, we need your support, your input, and so we changed a few things about the board meeting. we shortened them considerably. we stayed away from the details or did not get in the weeds on how you build a car, but the bigger questions of financing, more out, positioning, marketing, that sort of thing. the board was very supportive of that, and we kept them informed. you know, we just took off. >> leading general motors through bankruptcy and the government bailout, for
. and that is why it is so important for us to do the report that we did. i will give you a perfect example. you have loan officers at banks being paid bonuses and pay based on how many loans they created. not whether those were good loans. not taking into account whether the loans would later default and caused sick of it and losses. there were a number of different causes of the financial crisis. we tried to bring a lot of transparency to it, to report on that. we are also doing a lot of work in this area to say what has not been dealt with. you are exactly right, fannie and freddie is not dealt with under dodd-frank. but let's talk about dodd-frank for a moment. there have been reforms to our financial system, but there needs to be significantly more. one thing about dodd-frank is it sets up a framework. but ultimately not all of the rules are implemented. there are very important standards that need to be set by the regulators and treasury. because what we are worried about is trying to protect americans in the event of another financial crisis. we do not want to be in a situation where one
are a citizen of the united states, you have become the enemy. i do not see anything wrong with using drone strikes to take them out. i just do not they have done a good job, i believe. host: what do you think? you should be in charge of the program and targeting american citizens? -- who should be in charge? caller: i do not believe it should be the department of defense. understanding there are several 1r ectives, one being 5240- there is the required targeting of citizens, targeted hits for certifications of these drawings. some are purchased by organizations and various agencies. they are hitting civilians whether it is just electromagnetic or i pray that they are not killing innocent citizens. this is a question here. 30,000 additional drones to be released, tested, and evaluated over the united states? i think america needs to wake up. 30,000 additional draws while we have homelessness, veterans returning, you can put that kind of money over the united states of america. there are too many directives out there and contractors who are now using these devices targeting citizens as we si
the u.s. patent office issued patent number 46,454. i will give you a pop quiz. it was simply labeled john deere plow. but the implement sketched out on the page could just as easily been labeled, as some historians have named it, one of the most important inventions in american history. they called it the plow that broke the plains, and it did. by replacing cast-iron with smooth steel, john deere's innovation opened up huge new swaths of land for cultivation. it made it possible for towns like aberdeen south dakota my hometown to exist. before it killing and maker took a grown man a full 24 hours. after it, it took as little as five. and every pile of soil overturned upended another assumption about what the land could produce. that, to my mind, has been the story, not just of agricultural success, but of national success. and, indeed, of global progress. this kind of game changing innovation has enabled us to leap ahead, to break the points, to increase harvest, and to frankly, feed the whole world. sometimes innovations come from the most advanced science, other times they
, denying the reports. and countering it was the victim of u.s. hacking. >>> and the bulls are back from a three-day weekend. can the s&p 500 post an eighth straight week of gains? we've got four days to find out. it's tuesday, february 19th, 2013. "squawk box" begins right now. >>> good morning, everybody. welcome to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm becky quick along with joe kernen and andrew ross sorkin who is back from vacation. let's get started with the markets. as joe mentioned, the s&p winning streak has been a strong one. in the meantime, the dow is coming off a second straight weekly loss. although, really, if you looked at this last week, it was the ever so slightest of losses. u.s. equity futures are indicated higher. dow up by 21 points. s&p is up by two points above value fair and the nasdaq is up about 3. in 20 minutes, we'll turn to predictions on where the markets go from here. then in the next hour, delivering alpo. we'll talk to the manager of a $11.5 billion hedge fund. this fund was up 30% last year. don't miss pine river's ceo brian taylor. on our radar this morning,
to say a word about the councils africa center for the benefit of the audience, those who are new to us were joining us for the first time via television or the internet. the africa center was established in september, 2009, with a mission to help transform u.s. and other healthy approaches to africa by emphasizing the building of strong geopolitical partnerships with african states and strengthening economic growth and prosperity on the continent. the center seeks to engage and inform with policymakers in the general public of the strategic importance of effort that. both globally and for american and european interest in particular. a subject which obviously -- a commitment you share by joining us today. of strategic importance. we do this for -- a robust media presence. we worked promote constructive us leadership and engagement in international affairs is done the central role of the atlantic community in meeting international challenges. the africa center supports and collaborates with product -- public and private sectors, giving practical solutions to the challenges in africa. on
you all for joining us here today and thank you all who joined us. [applause] >> in a few moments, secretary of state john kerry gives an address at the university of virginia. in an hour, a defense -- department of defense briefing on sequestration. after that, it review of the 2012 presidential campaign with strategists from president obama and mitt romney. secretary of state john kerry is calling on congress not to make senseless reductions in foreign aid to automatic spending cuts scheduled to begin march 1. the secretary spoke at the university of virginia in charlottesville. he was introduced by virginia senator tim kaine. this is an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. thank you so much. hello, uva. it is great to be back on the grounds. i want to say to president sullivan what a treat it is to be here with you. thank you for hosting this great occasion. to my friend robert hurt, served with him in state government and now we travel to washington together. i look forward to good work together, especially if on this occasion to introduce secretary kerry and to introduce
's different? we have seen an enormous increase in the u.s. trade deficit, especially with countries like china. today, they happened to release a report that looked at the effect of currency manipulation, perhaps the single most important factor and explain the growth of our trade deficit. eliminating the trade deficit or eliminating currency manipulation could reduce the trade as a by roughly $190-$490 billion. doing this would increase manufacturing employment by up to 1 million jobs. that's a big downpayments in the whole we have created in manufacturing and employment. one thing we need to do is create demand. that is what we did do but we did not do that in the last decade. we need to shift the demand to domestic produced goods resulting in the hiring of domestic workers. manufacturing jobs are amongst the best for workers especially for those without a college degree. high wages, good benefits. >> bruce, you worked in washington, d.c., and brookings is right off dupont. >> i am mostly on a plane. >> industrial policy is a dirty word. if you go to any other domestic place, it will land yo
must end this uncertainty about this position. mr. president, it is time for us to end this debate. and that is what we will be voting on now. later on, there will be a vote on whether to confirm senator hagel. the vote now is whether to bring this debate to an end. i hope we will so we can get on to the nomination vote. i yield the floor. i think it's noon and time for a vote. the presiding officer: the senator's time has expired. the senator from oklahoma has 30 seconds remaining. the senator from oklahoma. mr. inhofe: let me say that we -- everything has been said, not everyone has said it. however, i would like to make sure that everyone understands that the actual statements that were made by the former senator hagel in terms of the relationship of our country with israel and iran prior to the time that he was nominated, because many of those statements were changed at that time. i encourage the no vote on cloture. the presiding officer: the time is expired. under the previous order, the clerk will report the motion to invoke cloture. the clerk: cloture motion, we the undersig
armed service committee. this should begin in a second. let us watch. we will cavill and to hear from defense secretary leon panetta and general martin dempsey about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi that resulted in the death of four americans. one week ago today, this committee heard from senator chuck hegel -- hagel to be the next defense secretary. the center of south carolina said he would put a hold on former senator hagel's nomination unless leon panetta agreed to testify. this is the first of two harris we will show you today. this and later this afternoon, the confirmation hearing for cia director nominee, john brennan, currently the counter-terrorism chief. >> good morning, everybody. we welcome secretary of defense leon panetta and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff general martin dempsey to testify about the department of defense's response to the deadly terrorist attack on the u.s. temporary mission facility in benghazi, libya on september 11 and all of last year. the findings of its review following that attack, including lessons learned. i want to remi
. "we must trust in the mighty power of god's mercy. we are all sinners, but his grace transforms us and makes us new." just ahead, benedict's health, his replacement, and what's next for the catholic church. "newsroom" starts now. >>> good morning. thank you so much for joining me. i'm carol costello. we begin with a bombshell greeting 1 billion catholics around the world. their spiritual leader, pope benedict xvi stepping down at the end of the month. we're bringing you all the angles of this developing story. joining me now for this hour's special coverage, chris cuomo, he's in new york. >> good morning, carol. great to joining here. >>> shocking news because this simply hasn't been done. it's been almost 600 years since a pope resigned. it was gregory xii. it was to end the civil war. the question becomes why is pope benedict doing this now? we're going to get reaction first because no one saw this coming, certainly in this country. let's start off our coverage with deb feyerick in st. patrick's cathedral in new york city, the center of the american catholic tradition here. deb,
uses his state of the union speech to urge congress to end the battle over the budget and work together to boost the u.s. economy and help the middle class. >> together we have cleared away the rubble of crisis. we can say with renewed confidence that the state of our union is strong. >>> there we go. >> who doesn't love to kick off a wednesday morning with the iea monthly oil report? >> they have lowered their oil demand growth expectations on weaker gdp forecasts. demand growth, 840,000 barrels a day in 2013. they've cut the forecast for opec crude to 29.8 million barrels a day. they say oil supply will hit a 12-month low in january. >> can we show crude and look at the reaction there? we'll take a look in one second. what else are they saying in this report? >> they say the non-opec supply will be rising. opec supply will be falling. non-opec supply is rising, one million barrels a day this year. then they talk about iran oil production hovering below the lowest in 30 years. new sanctions could see further declines in iranian output. they say the sanctions are costing around $40 bill
government is tied to a large number of cyber attacks on the u.s.. if the administration released a report that it will consider fines and other trade actions against china or any other country guilty of cyber espionage. we will continue to follow that story and bring you any remarks that may come out from administration officials today. the supreme court is expected to hear arguments in late march in two prominent cases that could test the bounds of laws restricting gay marriage. authors of "recently released book some day marriage recently debated the issue at harvard university. it is and about how to by the federalist society at harvard. this is one hour. >> thank you. richard fallon is the junior professor of constitutional law at harvard law school. he also earned a ba degree from oxford university, where he was a rhodes scholar. he served as a law clerk to justices of the united states supreme court and has written extensively about constitutional and federal courts law. he is the author of several books. we are very grateful for him for participating. andrew koppelman is the john p
to lifelock.com to try lifelock protection risk free for a full 60 days. use promo code: gethelp. plus get this document shredder free-- but only if you act righnow. call the number on your screen now! >> countdown to the countdown. mastercard launches a new app, kind of a digital wallet. find out why mastercard could be a gam game-changer. and some of the money flowing back to shareholders with another increase. the ceo talks was exclusively about 2013. plus, legendary investor on the market. stocks are due for a big fall, oil will take a spill, gold will shine once again. "countdown to the closing bell" starts right now. good afternoon, everybody, i am actually webster in this afternoon for liz claman. the last hour of trading and things have deteriorated over the last hour or so. we are bouncing back a little. most of the dow 30 as you can see is in the red. mcdonald's one of the key bright spots, verizon endocrine that is wal-mart. very few and far between. we are off of the session lows, down 105 points coming back from there down half a percent. the s&p down 10% of the nasdaq also up
using putting more and more on the backs of individuals. we've heard story after story this morning where there is irrational use in the delivery system because of the fragmentation that we have and we have seen through the payment reform that we have done that setting the right payment incentives in place actually does help rationalize the system and start to net the fabric together between the primary care and specialty care and we actually have hospitals that start to understand what their place in the reform system is there a cost center not a revenue center and they have to actually become smaller over time for the system to become sustainable, so to me, you know, to focus our attention on the individuals in the public and beneficiaries and how we are right to change their benefits to make all of this work seems like a full of air and when the real problem is the way that we have structured the incentive on the delivery system side and fixing that we can get a long range towards addressing affordability and quality. >> we have time for a question or two from the audience. if yo
, and how to present the program, how to do what you're doing now. host: your in the u.s., based in afghanistan, what are you doing here in washington? guest: i am here to say that open media in afghanistan is a big achievement. not only for the public, but for everyone i want to say that this is a big achievement after 11 years we lost more than 39 journalists from 2001 up until now, more than hundreds of injuries, more than thousands of arrests and people who were insulted and faced with harassment. let's not lose this achievement. a side of focus on security forces, stress fractures in afghanistan, focusing on media for lots of afghan people. afghans are quite aware what is freedom of expression and how they can use it in their daily lives. let's focus on it and not lose it. host: while you're in u.s., are you having to justify the money you are receiving? guest: yes, i have to justify the money we are receiving and say that not only for nai media institute, or the organizations we are receiving the money from, from ucid, the sector, the deal is something to really need focus.
"commitment to the values that define us as americans." others note his impeccable integrity and his dedication to the country is second to none. without unanimous consent, i would like to insert into the record matters the committee has received in regard to brennan's nomination. john brennan by all accounts will be a strong leader, guided firmly by the law and his strong ethical code. he has assured the committee in his response to pre-hearing questions that he will be independent from political influence. he will seek only to provide the president, the congress, and other leaders with his best analysis and advice. his responses to the committee's questions are available on the committee's website. intelligence.senate.gov. of course the committee must conduct its due diligence on such an important nominee, some members are going to have questions in a range of topics, including his plans for directing the agency, major national security challenges we face, positions and actions he has taken in his current and past jobs. also of interest will be mr. brennan's the view on the use of
to review and update nga policies. the staff advisory committee has recommended action in front of us all. this has been vetted with all of the staffs of the members of the state of the governors who are members of the committee. i think it has been well-known and well covered. i do not think there is a reason to discuss it unless someone has an objection. . i think emotion has been made. and seconded -- a motion estimate. and seconded. all in favor say aye? >> aye. >> adjourned, all in favor say aye? >> aye. [captions copyright nationalcable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed bynational captioning institute] >> we're opening the phone lines now. you can let us know what you think that what you heard from the governors during their meeting. the numbers to call her on your screen. you can also let us know what you think using twitter. if you called us in the past 30 days, give others a chance to weigh in. the governors have talked about education, cybersecurity, and employment for people with disabilities. our first caller is jane, on the line from columbus. what did you think ab
to u.s. national security and to international peace and security. north korea has been warning for weeks that it was about to test its nuclear arsenal. on tuesday morning, it exploded a bomb in a facility one kilometer underground near the same location of its nuclear test in 2006 and 2009. >> there is concern that they could come up with a delivery system for their nuclear weapons. >> reporter: last week the u.s. and south korean navies launched military drills in the region as a show of force. north korea's test demonstrates a significant split from its main patron, china. recently beijing warned leader kim jong-un against any weapons tests. >> they've said publicly that there would be real consequences for north korea. what those consequences are we have to see, but i suspect it's going to be more than an angry lettered. >> reporter: china is one of the few countries supporting north korea's fragile economy and could respond by cutting financial aid. this latest test may provide evidence of the strength of north korea's nuclear arsenal. >> if this is a uranium enrichment tes
their creator had given all of us. to make decisions for good or bad and normally to have to live with the consequences -- consequences of those decisions. the global jihadist threat that secretary clinton pointed out does not have the belief that a democracy is a good idea. that a people electing representatives in a republican form of government is a good idea. they believed that we need some religious leader like the ayatollah khomeini or now in iran. they need a religious leader like that that tells us what we can do, that makes all his decisions under shari'a law. . all of those who met during the revolution, they believed in the power of prayer to god, and that's why they prayed during that time, but they wanted much to have the chance to worship as they chose. be they muslim, hindu. but especially judeo-christian beliefs where jews and christians had traditionally suffered so much persecution. they wanted the chance for people to worship as they please or not worship, but they knew to make that possible had he had to -- they had to pray to god. that's why we are observing o
by the news. >> you are joking. the pope? oh, my god. >> i'm so shocked. he has been such a short time with us. >> joseph was born into a catholic family in germany and was forced into the hitler youth. he was brought up as a theologian. he became more conservative in the 1960's. it was as a traditionalist that he became the doctrinal watchdog for john paul ii. the people who met the pope said that he was shy and charming. his most important writings dealt with things such as the importance of love. >> he is the most intelligent, intelligent,pope we have had in years. his sermons and harmonies are beautiful. >> he warned that excluding christianity from national debate could be harmful for democracy. by the time pope benedict came to westminster cathedral, he renewed respect for his argument that religion should stay at the heart of public life. over the last few years, catholicism has grown in the developing world. in its birthplace of europe, he has found the tides of secularism, all but impossible to stem. the pope defended moslems by quoting historical criticisms of it is lomb. -- islam. h
start." thank you for joining us. i'm john berman. >> and i'm zoraida sambolin. >>> "starting point" with soledad o'brien starts right now. >> welcome, everybody. a developing story. bitter winter storm wreaking havoc across much of the country. roofs collapsing, drivers trapped and airports a mess two people are dead as record snow falls on the plains and flood warnings threaten the southeast. the storm turning out to be much worse than expected. live team coverage ahead. >>> and a new shocking investigation, "usa today" says there is a growing bioterror threat from within our own country. talking about diseases like anthrax and the plague. details in leave report. >>> new overnight, a hot air balloon carrying more than a dozen tourists explodes and crashes to the ground in egypt. also happening, one of britain's top catholic leaders speaking out about the grelatest scandal shocking the church. and a claim by a former friar that homosexuality is a ticking time bomb for the church. >>> we are all looking at itsly and why what's important for politic there is affecting what's happeni
for politic there is affecting what's happening in washington. >>> tom price will join us, the secretary of the navy, ray mabus, and sybrina fulton and tracy martin, trayvon martin's parents join us, along with their attorneys, benjamin crump, richard blais and makazive mandela. "starting point" starts now. we begin this morning talking about the devastating winter storm in parts of texas and oklahoma. already buried under more than a foot of snow. one local mayor says we have roofs collapsing all over town. we'll speak to him in a moment. highways and airports shut down. take a look at this photo taken by ireporter philip prince, an instructor too, spent eight hours stuck in his rig on interstate 40 east of amarillo, texas. two people have been killed. one on an ice-slicked road and another after a roof collapsed from the weight of the snow. severe weather is expected as far as florida. the massive system tracking to the north and east. wisconsin, michigan, illinois, all in its path. jennifer delgado is tracking the storm. erin mcpike is live in kansas city. we'll start with you. >> we'
. >> many thanks. keep us updated. that live report from pretoria outside the courthouse where oscar pistorius will appear shortly. now to the rest of news. israel has confirmed for the first time it's simple in prison and australian-is really national under a false name after reporting the restrictions on the so-called prisoner x were lifted. the man later died in custody. now this report. parks israel has broken its silence on the case of the mysterious prisoner x, a man who purportedly had died in this prison. the government has confirmed it jailed a man with dual nationality under a false name. its statement says " a prisoner was an israeli citizen and also had foreign citizenship was jailed for security reasons. prisoner was held under a pseudonym, but his family was notified of the arrest immediately." >> it goes on to say the prisoners' rights were observed at all times but that he was found dead in his cell two years ago. australian tv says this is the man held prisoner. he reportedly held israeli and australian citizenship and used three different names. ben zygier, ben alle
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is productivity and that sounds great because that's what the u.s. needs to get out of this issue. the problem is who is going to be the buyer and how is that going to work out with the currency wars? at some point we ask for, have a weak dollar, which active in the next country can buy the same machines and shop in barcelona, see the local market. are we looking at that end of the equation in terms of the offtake as they say in biofuels? >> well, there's a famous economist in the 1800s called jean baptiste say that man creates its own demand and that is certainly true, particularly in this case. as companies become more perfect is come at cheaper the kind cheaper. so we don't have the worry about somehow people will want things. we have about $45,000 in this country and i guarantee you the vast majority people would rather have a median income of $200,000 for 400,000 or a million and that's just us. in terms of currency, currency is a problem. fundamentally we cannot become our project even innovative is a country, were not going to get access to these markets. why is the german philosophy as
provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: the world witnessed something today it had not seen since the 15th century: a sitting pope, benedict xvi, announced he is giving up the papacy. the news reverberated around the globe and stunned many of the world's 1.2 billion catholics. >> it was a big surprise because this doesn't happen all the time. and my first reaction was to pray and to call my friends, texted my friends and asked even my non-catholic and nonbelieving friends to keep us in their thoughts and in their prayers. >> i had never heard anything like this in my life. the pope has to be there until he dies. and he is resigning? >> popes can't resign. this
's nuclear weapons and ballistic missile program constitutes a threat to u.s. national securityty and to international peace and security. ♪or north korea has been warning for weeks it was about to test its l. nuclear arsenal opinion on tuesday morning it exploded a in bomb in a facility one kilometerunderground underground, near the same same location location of its nuclear test in 2006 and 2009. >> there is concern that they could come could come up with a delivery system for their nuclear weapon weapons.eporter: l >> reporter: last week the u.s. .s. and south korea navies launched military drills in the region as a show of force.fo north korea's test demonstrates ificant a significant split from its main patron china. recently beijing warned leader ns kim jong-un against any weapons tests. >> they've said publicly there rea. would be real consequences for north korea. what those consequences are we have have to see but i suspect it's going to be more than an angry of letter. >> reporter: china is one of the few countries supporting north could respond korea's f
commander of u.s. forces in iraq general loy austin to lead the command which is responsible for operations of middle east and afghanistan. general austin was joined by u.s. command nominee general david rodriguez who is a top commander in afghanistan from 2007 to 2011. this hearing is chaired by carl levin of michigan. it is two hours. >> good morning everybody and welcome this morning that committee considers the nomination of two very distinguished officers to the two of the most active and challenging combatant commands. general lloyd austin united states army nominated to the commander u.s. central command, and general david rodriquez, u.s. army to be nominated to be commander of the u.s. africa command. fees' to combat and commands, centcom and africom are the centers of gravity for the military's operations to counter the threat of terrorism. both nominees have served the country with distinction, and i want to faint each of you for your decades of military service and a willingness to serve once again. i and stand general austin's life and rodriguez's life are with us this morning.
the doors of gandolfo close and they leave. let's go down to keir simmons covering it all for us. kear, good morning to you. >> reporter: hey, savannah, good morning, the saints looking down on the square have not seen a day like this in medieval times. in the papal palace, over my shoulder here, the pope, as you say, has been meeting were his cardinals, tells them, i'll be with you in prayer. dawn across rome. this city has seen more than 260 pontiffs, only two popes passed in the last thousand years have left like this. the cardinals, princes of the church, gathered this morning for a warm farewell to pope benedict. some cardinals wants to speak to him for as long as possible. pope benedict will resign just after sunset. this home, this beautiful summer palace, quiet after a frantzic few weeks. >> at 8:00 exactly, he will stop being pope, the swiss guards who stand guard outside the palace and he'll go. >> reporter: rough seas he admitted yesterday and now the task begins of choosing his successor. >> i think there's a yearning out there for something different. somebody new somebody fresh
time, and i hope you'll be able to join us. we love to keep hearing from you. so god bless you, stay inspired, keep painting, and i promise to see you right here real soon on another yarnell school of fine art. >> you are watching the "journal" from berlin. >> these are our top stories -- pope benedict bids farewell to huge crowds the day before he formally steps down as leader of the italian catholic church. >> the italian prime minister cancels an appointment with germany's main opposition candidate. >> in german soccer, dortmund prepared to defend their title against high-flying bayern munich. it seemed that the lord was sleeping -- that was today's emotional farewell message from pope benedict xvi as he acknowledged the rough seas that marked his time as head of the catholic church. >> it was his final public address before retiring, speaking to pins -- tens of thousands of faithful, he referred to the struggles enjoy of his papacy. >> we will be going live to rome in a moment to get more detail on the speech, but first, a closer look, and the momentous day for catholics around t
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